Syrian Health Assessment and Migration pilot project

WestMental Health
Start Date: 1 Feb 2017

Syrian Health Assessment and Migration pilot project

Background

Triggered by the Syrian war, 4.6 million Syrians now form what has become the largest refugee population from a single conflict in a generation. This project, working with refugees and support groups in the CLAHRC West area, will develop research methods to assess local health needs. This work will also inform the planning of a larger-scale study to investigate the mental and physical health needs of Syrian refugees in the UK, and in several countries in Europe and the Middle East.

Refugees are at greater risk of developing mental health problems because of their experiences. They are also likely to feel dislocated and powerless in the new culture and its unfamiliar institutions and systems. The development of policies that respond to refugees’ specific health needs and service access is therefore important for the UK which has pledged to resettle 20,000 Syrian refugees by 2020 under the Syrian Vulnerable Person Resettlement (VPR) Programme and the community sponsorship scheme. Policies to support them need to be underpinned by good evidence about their mental health and wellbeing, and how they develop coping mechanisms and resilience.

Project aims

The aim of the project is find out how best to design and carry out a future study that will investigate the influences and effects on Syrian’s refugees’ mental health, wellbeing and resilience over time. We will explore a number of factors such as age at migration, psychological traits and types of resettlement programmes as well as their experiences of leaving their home country in often terrible circumstances.

Anticipated impacts

The aim of the project is find out how best to design and carry out a future study that will investigate the influences and effects on Syrian’s refugees’ mental health, wellbeing and resilience over time. We will explore a number of factors such as age at migration, psychological traits and types of resettlement programmes as well as their experiences of leaving their home country in often terrible circumstances.

Contact 
Dr Loubaba Mamluk
l.mamluk@bristol.ac.uk