the COINCIDE long-term follow-up

Greater ManchesterMental Health
Start Date: 1 Mar 2014 End Date: 30 Sep 2017

Exploring the evidence in support of collaborative care for depression in patients with coronary heart disease/diabetes: the COINCIDE long-term follow-up (COINCIDE 24)

What did we do?

The COINCIDE study provided good evidence of the short-term effectiveness of the COINCIDE collaborative care model as a treatment for depression in patients with long-term conditions. This work assessed the long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the intervention.

Why was it important?

When combined with a long-term condition, depression leads to the greatest reductions in quality of life. Depression and anxiety are known to drive unscheduled care in the health service, and the health economic impact of mental and physical multimorbidity is significant. Work by the King’s Fund has shown that depression increases the cost of care for patients with long-term conditions by at least 45%, or from £3910 to £5670 a year. Managing mental and physical multimorbidity is difficult and poses challenges for all health services.

How did we do it?

We assessed the evidence of the long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the COINCIDE intervention using the original trial cohort over a 24 month period.

Contact 
Dr Peter Coventry
peter.coventry@york.ac.uk