Helping Urgent Care Users Cope with Distress about Physical Complaints
9 Oct 2018

Helping Urgent Care Users Cope with Distress about Physical Complaints

Published Date: 9 Oct 2018

The Helping Urgent Care Users Cope with Distress about Physical Complaints study is a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evaluating the clinical and cost effectiveness of a randomised control trial of remotely delivered Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for repeat users of unscheduled/urgent care who have high health anxiety. Alongside the RCT two doctoral studies are being conducted looking at the barriers and facilitators to delivering the intervention and factors contributing to the optimisation of therapy. The study has recruited 156 participants and 71% (56) have completed or received 5 or more remotely delivered CBT sessions.

In addition a consent form was included for participants who wanted to be further involved in the study and its dissemination. This requested permission to contact participants to invite them to involvement events. Some of those who wished to be further involved took part in video interviews, in which they shared their experiences of what life was like prior to the study, during the study and changes since. Participant involvement aimed to give greater voice to people most affected by the study and the intervention involved. The eight participant experience videos can be used as a patient information resource, as it will provide a realistic and personal view on what they can expect from CBT for health anxiety and a clear idea of how remotely delivered therapy can work. It can also serve as a training resource for healthcare professionals considering using similar mediums and to facilitate a better understanding of health anxiety from a patient perspective.

Video testimonials have been produced from participants who were involved in the study sharing their experiences of having health anxiety and receiving the therapy

Contribution of CLAHRC East Midlands

NIHR CLAHRC East Midlands provided sufficient funding to produce professional quality participant experience videos and to support participants to take part. This gave value to the content of the videos and made it possible to use as a patient resource and a training resource for health care professionals and service users.

What happened next?

Video testimonials have been produced from participants who were involved in the study sharing their experiences of having health anxiety and receiving the therapy. In addition two information videos have also been produced about health anxiety and how it works to serve as other publically available information resources. Click the links below to access the videos: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zkrci_LeMZI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1CoGDOVgME

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3OZ3foai40

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Hravy3FJDw

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmpV-itQZxE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9NpefJrMXQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcXxBwsI074